Tag Archives: Street Fence

Art Deco street fence

Art Deco street fence, mid-1930s property, Cotoroceni area, Bucharest (©Valentin Mandache)

Above is one of the multitude of Art Deco street fence motifs, which can be encountered by any casual visitor throughout Bucharest. It depicts a series of sunbursts or reflector beams, very typical of that style’s decorative panoply.

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I endeavour through this series of periodic articles to inspire appreciation of the historic houses of Romania, a virtually undiscovered, but fascinating chapter of European architectural history and heritage.

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If you plan acquiring or selling a historic property in Romania or start a renovation project, I would be delighted to advice you in sourcing and transacting the property, specialist research, etc. To discuss your particular plan please see my contact details in the Contact page of this weblog.

Neo-Romanian style fences

The architectural design and craftsmanship attained a peak in Romania in terms of quality and excellence during the late 1920s until de advent of the Second World War. The communist and post communist decades that followed saw the dramatic decline of those skills and talent, which are now just a poor shadow of those former years of glory. Some of the profusely conspicuous architectural elements created in that period are the street fences, among which the Neo-Romanian style fences are of often of a spectacular and intriguing design. Bellow are two such examples that have survived those decades of vicissitudes without much maintenance or contemplation from the inhabitants of this city.

Neo-Romanian style street fence dating from the early 1930s, Dacia area, Bucharest (©Valentin Mandache)

The wrought iron fence seen in the above example contains Neo-Romanian motifs seen especially in the Greek cross motif decorating its upper band. I like how the designer solved the problem of absence of proper fence poles by extending the structure over the concrete base at regular intervals, a position also decorated in an ampler fashion, with an arched motif atop, reminding the Byzantine arches frequently encountered in the panoply of the Neo-Romanian style.

Neo-Romanian style fence dating from the early 1930s, Dacia area, Bucharest (©Valentin Mandache)

This street fence example contains massive poles adorned atop with the rope motif, often encountered in ethnographic and church decoration. The poles are a national-romantic metaphor for the medieval citadel towers that populate the Romanian romantic literature, referring to the medieval national resistance against invasions from all directions. The fence itself is made from high quality wrought iron, displaying outlines that remind of Brancovan era (the Wallachian late medieval period) church broken arches and wall structures that resulted from a unique synthesis between the Byzantine Christian and Ottoman Islamic decorative registers.

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I endeavour through this series of periodic articles to inspire appreciation of the historic houses of Romania, a virtually undiscovered, but fascinating chapter of European architectural history and heritage.

***********************************************

If you plan acquiring or selling a historic property in Romania or start a renovation project, I would be delighted to advice you in sourcing and transacting the property, specialist research, etc. To discuss your particular plan please see my contact details in the Contact page of this weblog.

Neo-Romanian style street fence

Neo-Romanian style street fence dating from late 1920s, Victoriei area, Bucharest. (©Valentin Mandache)

For many architectural styles the street fence is a discreet piece within the architectural assembly, purposefully minimised in order to not obscure or compete with the design of the building that it fences behind. That is not the case with the Neo-Romanian style, where in most cases the street fence is very conspicuous and noticeable for the observer on the street, announcing the flamboyance and massivity of the architecture of the house that it hedges within. The Neo-Romanian style fences are remarkable because of their heavyweight appearance, modelling the aspect of a medieval citadel walls and harrow gates (portcullis), where the fence posts resemble massive Byzantine church towers or those of the cula fortified houses peculiar to the Oltenia region of south western Romania. In some cases the fence poles echo even the Ottoman Islamic tomb stones, an allusion to the old triumphant epic battles that took place in this erstwhile frontier region of Europe between the local Christian princes (like Vlad the Impaler or Stephen the Great in the c16th) and the mighty Islamic forces of the then Ottoman Empire. The photograph above presents one such eloquent Neo-Romanian style street fence, which I recently found in an upmarket area of Bucharest (Victoriei).

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I endeavor through this series of daily articles to inspire appreciation of the historic houses of Romania, a virtually undiscovered, but fascinating chapter of European architectural history and heritage.

***********************************************

If you plan acquiring a historic property in Romania or start a renovation project, I would be delighted to advice you in sourcing the property, specialist research, planning permissions, restoration project management, etc. To discuss your particular plan please see my contact details in the Contact page of this weblog.

Neo-Romanian Style Street Fence

A attractive example of wrought iron Neo-Romanian style street fence dating from mid-1920s, provided with massive, bollard like, brick and concrete fence posts. Armeneasca area, Bucharest (©Valentin Mandache)

The ironwork decorative outline of the basic street fence element, shown in the lower left hand side corner of the photomontage above, is formed by textbook Neo-Romanian motifs, inspired from the Byzantine and Ottoman church/ mosque decoration register. The shape of the massive fence posts resembles Ottoman cemetery tombstones. The street fence represents a major architectural component within the assembly of a Neo-Romanian style house, often made from high quality materials by the skilled craftsmen from the inter-war period, a fact which explains the high rate of survival over the ensuing tumultuous decades of many such fine examples in a quite unscathed state.

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I endeavor through this daily series of images and small articles to inspire appreciation of the historic houses of Romania, a virtually undiscovered, but fascinating chapter of European architectural history and heritage.

***********************************************

If you plan acquiring a historic property in Romania or start a renovation project, I would be delighted to advice you in sourcing the property, specialist research, planning permissions, restoration project management, etc. To discuss your particular plan please see my contact details in the Contact page of this weblog.