Book launch invitation “Patrie & Destin”

Originally posted on Diana Mandache's Weblog:

Your are invited to the book launch of “Fatherland and Destiny. The Crown Princess of Romania” by Diana Mandache.

Thursday 31 May 2012, 2 pm, at The ‘Bookfest’

Bucharest (Romexpo), Pavilion C2,  LITERA publishing house

“Fatherland and Destiny” [Patrie si Destin] brings for the first time together, a significant part of the myriad of events, places and people encountered throughout the life of Her Royal Highness The Crown Princess Margarita of Romania. Her destiny is often congruent with that of her father, King Michael, and her life has been profoundly influenced by the more recent history of her country and south east Europe. His Majesty is the one who, by naming Princess Margarita as his successor, has shown vision in understanding the necessity to adapt to the realities of the new century, paralleling the approach of his illustrious predecessors King Carol I or King Ferdinand, in the…

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Mature phase Neo-Romanian style houses

I photographed the Neo-Romania style houses presented bellow during the walking architectural tours which I organised in the Patriarchy Hill area. They date from the apogee phase of the development of Romania’s national style, which took place between the second part of the 1900s (starting with 1906, more precisely, when this architectural style was presented to the larger public with the occasion of the Great Royal Jubilee Exhibition of that year in Bucharest) and the late 1920s (when the Art Deco and Modernist styles became serious contenders on the local architectural scene).

Mature phase Neo-Romanian style housedating from the mid-1910s, Patriarchy Hill area, Bucharest (©Valentin Mandache)

This is a well proportioned house embellished with a beautiful roof crest flanked by finials. The ample veranda is particularly attractive with tri-lobed arches, short columns decorated with the rope motif and elaborated floral gallery panels. The ceramic tile roof is inspired from the shingle roof encountered on peasant houses in the region.

Mature phase Neo-Romanian style house dating from the early 1920s, Patriarchy hill area, Bucharest (©Valentin Mandache)

The above edifice is again amply embellished with Neo-Romanian motifs, the most prominent being the mock cula tower (fortified yeoman house from south western Romania) at its centre, a beautiful colonated  first floor veranda with tri-lobed arches and a well designed attic that is also provided with a veranda boasting ethnografic motifs. On the ground floor is space for shops, while on the floors above are living quarters. Unfortunately the recent renovations have disfigured this remarkable building, the old ceramic tile roof being replaced with an ugly metallic one, while most of the wooden window frames are now impersonal plastic frame double glazing.

Mature phase Neo-Romanian style house, dating from the late 1920s, Patriarchy Hill area, Bucharest (©Valentin Mandache)

The mock cula tower is again obvious on the Neo-Romanian style dwelling from the above photograph. The building is provided with an impressive arched doorway and two ethnographic verandas.

Mature phase Neo-Romanian style house, dating from the early 1920s, Patriarchy Hill area, Bucharest (©Valentin Mandache)

The omnipresent mock cula tower is again visible in the make up of the house presented in this image. Apparently there are not references to the holy trinity in its decorative and structural elements, as the Neo-Romanian style would usually require, probably because of the small space available for such expressions. I believe an exception was the main window, which now has a plastic double glazing frame, where the original one would have been a church triptych inspired one.

Recommend Historic Houses of Romania blog to friends and strangers

Historic Houses of Romania blog author at the Central School, designed by arch. Ion Mincu in 1890 in the Neo-Romanian style, Bucharest (photo: arch. Daniela Puia)

Dear readers,

I hope you like the Historic Houses of Romania blog articles about the rich, diverse and highly particular architectural heritage of this region of South East Europe. If that is the case, then why not recommend it to friends, acquaintances or even strangers that might cross your way, or spread the word about the site on your social media or website of choice: Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, SumbleUpon and whatever else is under the Sun :)

I trust that you will continue to find interesting the new articles which I am constantly preparing, supplemented since last year by the architectural history walking tours in Bucharest and other locations in Romania!

Yours,

Valentin Mandache

Expert in Romania’s historic houses

(Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/casedeepoca Twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/casedeepoca)

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I endeavour through this series of periodic articles to inspire appreciation of the historic houses of Romania, a virtually undiscovered, but fascinating chapter of European architectural history and heritage.

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If you plan acquiring or selling a historic property in Romania or start a renovation project, I would be delighted to advice you in sourcing and transacting the property, specialist research, etc. To discuss your particular plan please see my contact details in the Contactpage of this weblog.

The Moon seen from Bucharest

Last night the Moon was at perigee, in spectacular full-moon phase, the Earth’s satellite looking larger than usual, reflecting an ampler amount of sunlight. The Bucharest night-sky at 22.00h, when I made the photograph (first image bellow), featured an eerie blue complexion induced by the atypical brightness. In those glare conditions the Moon’s surface relief was less distinguishable, apart form its seas and major craters, such as the impressive Tycho crater from the southern hemisphere. The lunar landscape was certainly more noticeable a week ago, on 30 April, when I made the second photograph presented bellow, with the Moon in waxing gibbous phase, which favoured a better visibility of its meteor impact craters, especially those located in the twilight area between the day and night zones. The photographs were taken with a Canon SX20is.

Moon in full phase seen from Bucharest on 5 May ’12 (©Valentin Mandache)

Moon in waxing gibbous phase seen from Bucharest on 30 April ’12 (©Valentin Mandache)

The Moon seen from Bucharest

Last night the Moon was at perigee, in spectacular full-moon phase, the Earth’s satellite looking larger than usual, reflecting an ampler amount of sunlight. The Bucharest night-sky at 22.00h, when I made the photograph (first image bellow), featured an eerie blue complexion induced by the atypical brightness. In those glare conditions the Moon’s surface relief was less distinguishable, apart form its seas and major craters, such as the impressive Tycho crater from the southern hemisphere. The lunar landscape was certainly more noticeable a week ago, on 30 April, when I made the second photograph presented bellow, with the Moon in waxing gibbous phase, which favoured a better visibility of its meteor impact craters, especially those located in the twilight area between the day and night zones. The photographs were taken with a Canon SX20is.

Moon in full phase seen from Bucharest on 5 May ’12 (©Valentin Mandache)

Moon in waxing gibbous phase seen from Bucharest on 30 April ’12 (©Valentin Mandache)

The many “lives” of a Neo-Romanian style finial

Bellow is the photograph of a beautiful Neo-Romanian style rooftop finial presented in seven image processing instances, thus exuding something from its powerful symbolism or even magic. It is an ethnographic type finial, modelling a wood carved pole, an artefact encountered in the decoration of Romanian peasant houses.

Neo-Romanian style finial, unprocessed image, 1920s house, Mantuleasa area, Bucharest (©Valentin Mandache)

Neo-Romanian style finial, inverse colours image, 1920s house, Mantuleasa area, Bucharest (©Valentin Mandache)

Neo-Romanian style finial, 1960s style colours image, 1920s house, Mantuleasa area, Bucharest (©Valentin Mandache)

Neo-Romanian style finial, heath map image, 1920s house, Mantuleasa area, Bucharest (©Valentin Mandache)

Neo-Romanian style finial, Holga camera like image, 1920s house, Mantuleasa area, Bucharest (©Valentin Mandache)

Neo-Romanian style finial, neon style image, 1920s house, Mantuleasa area, Bucharest (©Valentin Mandache)

Neo-Romanian style finial, pencil sketch image, 1920s house, Mantuleasa area, Bucharest (©Valentin Mandache)

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The 10 most popular Historic Houses of Romania articles in April 2012

  1. ART DECO Bucharest building damaged through ignorance and avarice
  2. The NEO-ROMANIAN ARCHITECTURAL STYLE: a brief guide on its origins and features
  3. Earthquake Events in Bucharest and Their Effect on Historic Houses
  4. Little Paris style wagon house
  5. Art Nouveau ironwork ornaments
  6. Art Deco service door
  7. CASOTA CONAC: a magnificent Romanian period property with a great potential
  8. Images from the Art Deco style walking tour on Saturday 7 April ’12
  9. Mondrian like Art Deco – Modernist hallway floor patterns
  10. Art Deco Era Wall & Doorway Lamps: Photomontage & Slide Show