Daily Picture 6-Sep-09: “Boiled down” Neo-Romanian Style

I endeavor through this daily image series to inspire appreciation of the historic houses of Romania, a virtually undiscovered, but fascinating chapter of European architectural heritage.

***********************************************

Neo-Romanian style windows, late 1930s house, Cotroceni area, bucharest (©Valentin Mandache)

Neo-Romanian style windows, early 1940s house, Cotroceni area, Bucharest (©Valentin Mandache)

The Neo-Romanian style is usually a highly decorative and heavy looking architectural order, especially in its initial phases in late 19th c. and first two and a half decades of the 20th c. A process of abstractisation toward essential lines started in 1930s when examples of buildings displaying a symbiosis between Neo-Romanian and Art Deco or Modernist styles emerged in a large number in Bucharest. It has also evolved “on its own” toward abstraction, without apparent outside influneces, and the photograph above presents such a “boiled down” Neo-Romanian style example, which is rarely found today. In this particular instance she Neo-Romanian style in its essence is well outlined through the Byzantine arched windows delineated by simple mouldings painted in white that contrast with dark grey background of the facade, positioned in such a way as to resemble the tower of the cula, the late medieval fortified house from the Oltenia region from which it claims its origins. The two small Greek crosses under the upper windows’ sill also indicate the style’s other major source of inspiration from the local Orthodox church architecture.

***********************************************

If you plan acquiring a historic property in Romania or start a renovation project, I would be delighted to advice you in locating the property, specialist research, planning permissions, restoration project management, etc. To discuss your particular plan please see my contact details in the Contact page of this weblog.

Daily Picture 6-Sep-09: "Boiled down" Neo-Romanian Style

I endeavor through this daily image series to inspire appreciation of the historic houses of Romania, a virtually undiscovered, but fascinating chapter of European architectural heritage.

***********************************************

Neo-Romanian style windows, late 1930s house, Cotroceni area, bucharest (©Valentin Mandache)

Neo-Romanian style windows, early 1940s house, Cotroceni area, Bucharest (©Valentin Mandache)

The Neo-Romanian style is usually a highly decorative and heavy looking architectural order, especially in its initial phases in late 19th c. and first two and a half decades of the 20th c. A process of abstractisation toward essential lines started in 1930s when examples of buildings displaying a symbiosis between Neo-Romanian and Art Deco or Modernist styles emerged in a large number in Bucharest. It has also evolved “on its own” toward abstraction, without apparent outside influneces, and the photograph above presents such a “boiled down” Neo-Romanian style example, which is rarely found today. In this particular instance she Neo-Romanian style in its essence is well outlined through the Byzantine arched windows delineated by simple mouldings painted in white that contrast with dark grey background of the facade, positioned in such a way as to resemble the tower of the cula, the late medieval fortified house from the Oltenia region from which it claims its origins. The two small Greek crosses under the upper windows’ sill also indicate the style’s other major source of inspiration from the local Orthodox church architecture.

***********************************************

If you plan acquiring a historic property in Romania or start a renovation project, I would be delighted to advice you in locating the property, specialist research, planning permissions, restoration project management, etc. To discuss your particular plan please see my contact details in the Contact page of this weblog.